25 thoughts on “Carpe Diem – Angels

    • Really strong haiku – really very good question at the end…but what is this 5/7/5 stuff! That has NEVER been a requirement of haiku. Of hokku, yes! For haiku – the form never overrides the meaning, and the ‘syllables’ are for Japanese sounds, and are only applied by some haijin. Too much haiku policing!

      • You know, some online journals still insist on the 5-7-5 stuff for English haiku, while some others reject them..Since they originated in Japan, traditional syllables are probably more suited to the Japanese language..Anyway, thank you so much as always, Pirate

      • Hi – thanks, yes – I felt the comment you received with the ”taps” was totally inappropriate and offensive. Haiku has never been mandated as 5/7/5 syllables, even if some bloggers ruin haiku by insisting on it. 5/7/5 comes from hokku, which were the first lines of renga, which was communal poetry, chanted. There is not a haiku haijin in existence who would insist on this for haiku!
        Japanese doesn’t have formal syllables anyway. I feel your haiku are beautiful, and forcing you to apply a non-existent rule is petty and manipulative.
        5/7/5 serves as useful guidelines at most. Best regards nightlake!

      • Hi Pirate, I agree with you on the syllables. Most of my haiku do not follow this..took those comments in the fun spirit..I learnt quite a few things today on hokku and renga…and thank you for your kind words of motivation. I am grateful and appreciate your encouragement for my work. Warm Regards, Nightlake

      • Thanks very much…yes..understand the fun..but….I certainly enjoy reading your work very much, and think it stands out, not needing modification..

      • few writers can appreciate other writing with generosity..Thank you so much for this! and your encouragement always motivates me..A writer needs this kind of appreciation..Thanks always!

  1. What does Carpe Diem refer to? The conscience v the angel is a bit esoteric for me, unless you are contrasting myth and reality. Great as Haiku.

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