KZ’s 100 Nightmares – Cover Description

Most of you know KZ, but for those who do not – she is an impressive photographer and an amazing writer of short stories, haiku and haibun. KZ has a commanding vocabulary and plays with words. The best thing about her is that she is not scared to explore the forbidden or move out of the comfort zone. Her writing is not inhibited or restricted to a certain category.

Now KZ is publishing her long-awaited book, 100 Nightmares. If you are lover of horror, just don’t miss it. And you don’t even have to turn the page impatiently for the ending. The book is due in April and here is the cover description.

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100 NIGHTMARES by K.Z. Morano is a collection of horror stories written in exactly 100 words and accompanied by a few illustrations.

It takes a brief encounter with death to cause enduring nightmares.

A single well-placed blow could maim you for life…

One well-placed word could haunt you forever.

Microfiction is a blade—sharp, swift…

Sometimes it goes for the jugular, killing you in seconds.

Its silver tongue touches your throat and warm blood hisses before you could scream.

Sometimes, the knife makes micro-cuts on the sensitive sheath of your sanity, creating wounds that would fester throughout eternity.

Take my 100 words like prescription… a slow-acting poison.

Or read them all and die of overdose.

Your call.

It’s your suicide after all.

The Author

K.Z. Morano is an eclectic eccentric… a writer, a beach bum and a chocolate addict who writes anything from romance and erotica to horror, fantasy, sci-fi and bizarro fiction. Over the past few months, her stories have appeared in various anthologies, magazines and online venues. Visit her at http://theeclecticeccentricshopaholic.wordpress.com/ where she posts short fiction and photographs weekly.
For more updates on the story collection like K.Z.’s Facebook page www.facebook.com/100Nightmares

Alastair’s Photo Fiction – Him

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He stared at the ship, called Victoria. Now was the time to attack, he felt. The ship was surrounded by fog and his men were ready with weapons, just waiting for a word from him. He was about to turn when a moment caught his attention. An elegant woman, aboard Victoria’s deck, was examining something. He, with an eye for these things, could clearly see that the ‘something’ was diamond. Then she carelessly tossed it to the river, as he stared. Now she held a chain, examining it. In a thoughtless frame of mind, he jumped into the sea to retrieve precious jewellery.

The next moment, a squad from Victoria jumped into the nameless ship. “You are under arrest.” thundered the commander. He called a number as the dumbfounded pirates were handcuffed.
“Task done, ma’am”
The elegant lady smiled, “All for some trinklets.”
This was written for Alastair’s photo fiction.

Ligo Haibun Challenge – Emptiness

Emptiness! That is what I felt as I looked at the war ravaged land. I cannot tell you the name of the place so ravaged by state-sponsored atrocities. However, the once-beautiful city was littered with bodies while the few remaining survivors sobbed. No house had a child anymore; such was the government’s tactic.

Barren land..

infant wails

from unknown place

This was written for the Ligo Haibun Challenge.

 

Short Story Review – Bartleby, the Scrivener

What if you just go to office and tell your boss, ‘I prefer not to”, if you are saddled with some mundane task? What if you refuse to do all work and still persist on going to your workplace? You do not want pay, but just occupy a place in your office, refusing to leave. Here, we all can imagine your boss’s next step. However, what would a 19th century employer have done in similar circumstances? He would probably just let his employee come and go as he wishes and even let him live there, till his patience runs out, of course.

You may have guessed that the previous paragraph speaks about Herman Melville’s, ‘Bartleby, the Scrivener’.  Bartleby is a ‘copyist’ who joins the narrator’s law firm. He is diligent for a short period of time, until one day he refuses to proofread his work. The narrator is momentarily lost for words when Bartleby says, ‘I prefer not to.’ After a few days, Bartleby absolutely refuses to do any kind of work, complaining of a problem with his eyesight. His boss tries to get him to move out of his office, but in vain. He also discovers that Bartleby lives and sleeps in the office. Though he looks pale and seems silent, Bartleby holds a power over the lawyer with his passive resistance, ‘I prefer not to.’ His boss considers calling in the police to move Bartleby, but somehow does not have the heart to do that. Does Bartleby leave or does he start working again for the lawyer? What exactly is his problem?

Herman Melville’s short story dwells into the emotional imbalance of a young employee and its impact on those around him. Apart from Bartleby and the narrator, there are two more important characters, Turkey and Nippers.  Middle-aged Turkey is efficient in the morning, but loses his temper in the afternoons, making mistakes. Nippers, a young man, is just his opposite, preferring to work in the afternoons, but idle away the morning with stomach problems. The narrator is a highly tolerant employer and there is no question of turning anyone away. Though hilarious in the beginning, the story turns sad and miserable. Behind Bartleby’s blank expression, silence and mechanical attitude, there perhaps lurks some vulnerable man with a dreary past. If you have not already read this, check it out now to find the ending to this sad masterpiece.

Here is the link.

 

Haibun Thinking – Quote

‘Gathering her brows like gathering storm, Nursing her wrath to keep it warm.’ – Robert Burns

The poet writes and looks at the telephone, his heart still thudding from the ramifications of her phone call. He recalls her angry words of never wanting to see him again and his equally vehement response. He regrets it now and wonders if she is also going through the same agony. The phone rings softly now, almost musical. He knows who is on the line. He smiles, tears his note and leaves to attend the call.

Sea boils with wrath..

each resident reciprocates

waiting for lasting peace

This was written for Haibun Thinking.

Ligo Haibun Challenge

Quotes Week

“Wise men talk about ideas, intellectuals about facts, and the ordinary man talks about what he eats.”

I stroll to the food court, listening to the stall owner gossiping about anybody who could not hear him. I smile, knowing that he would gossip about me after I walk away. He tells off everybody, but takes less money and always serves more than what they demand. The street dog enters the food court and barks non-stop. He throws some food at it, while berating the non-paying ‘customer’. The dog, understanding nothing, wags his tail humbly.

Stray intruders fly away

as lame words

fall on deaf ears

This was written for the Ligo Haibun Challenge. Thank you, Pirate and Esenga, for the opportunity.

Life – Haibun Thinking

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Trees are cut furiously and logs are rolled down with delight. The horses, Ryan and Julie, dig the earth excitedly, knowing that something is going on. Deforestation is taken to a new level, with no sign of life, except for the humans. There is a strange sadness all around, even Julie and Ryan silent. Their groom unties them, letting them out to graze. As Julie feeds nearby, Ryan runs around in anger and excitement. All of a sudden, there is a loud shriek. Ryan is rolling down, with legs bruised from the log. Two horses now one, as Ryan is shot down. Humans systematically resume deforestation, as Julie watches.

All signs of life

destroyed with haste

machines at work

This was written for Haibun Thinking, a new challenge by Anja, Alastair, Summerstommy and Anelephant. Do please take part to support them and the art of Haibun.